VERY RARE ORIGINAL GROUPING OF A GUARD IN THE

2. / SS-TOTENKOPF STURMBANN FLOSSENBURG CONCENTRATION CAMP

   

item # C - 320

The holster is marked H. Eger & Linde Seligenthal 1938. They were the only manufacturer of SS-Totenkopf Verbände pistol holsters

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Offered for sale is a

VERY RARE ORIGINAL GROUPING OF A GUARD IN THE

2. / SS-TOTENKOPF STURMBANN FLOSSENBURG CONCENTRATION CAMP

This very interesting grouping consists of the original SS Soldbuch of Georg Steube who was a guard at KL Flossenbürg with the 2. / SS-Totenkopf Stuba. Flossenbürg. The Soldbuch was issued to him on 1 December 1944 and it has many Waffen-SS Flossenbürg concentration camp stamps. Also part of this unique grouping is his today very rare original SS-TK issued pistol holster, bearing the death head on the upper flap. It is maker marked Heger & Linde Seligenthal and dated 1938. This company was the only maker of pistol holsters for the Waffen-SS Totenkopf Verbände. The third item is a photo postcard, showing the ruins of the castle of Flossenbürg. Steube used this postcard as a SS field post and it also contains two stamps from the concentration camp. A very rare grouping, everything offered with full money back guarantee for authenticity.

Flossenbürg concentration camp

After Dachau, Buchenwald and Sachsenhausen, Flossenbürg was the fourth concentration camp established in Germany by the Nazis. It was in a small village located in a beautiful area, with many forests and mountains, not far from Weiden. This location was chosen by Himmler in May 1938. The first prisoners arrived in Flossenbürg during Spring 1938. Six weeks later, on May 3, 1938, the first 100 prisoners transported from Dachau concentration camp arrived at the newly designated Flossenbürg concentration camp. Initially, the SS intended the camp as a place of detention for males, particularly those rounded up in the winter and spring of 1938 in the course of the major police operations to remove so-called asocial persons and repeat criminal offenders from German streets. The SS planned to deploy the prisoners as forced laborers in the nearby stone quarry owned by the SS company German Earth and Stone Works (Deutsche Erd- und Steinwerke).  On September 1, 1939, while the German Army was invading Poland, the concentration camp of Dachau was partially evacuated in order to be used as a training center for the future SS extermination squads. 981 prisoners from Dachau were transferred to Flossenbürg. Due to the increasing number of prisoners, the camp was constantly being transformed, and on April 5, 1940, the first convoy of foreign prisoners arrived in Flossenbürg. There were over 4,000 prisoners in the Flossenbürg main camp in February 1943. More than half were political prisoners (mainly Soviet, Polish, Czech, Dutch, and German). Almost 800 were Germans identified as repeat criminal offenders; more than 100 were homosexuals; and seven were Jehovah's Witnesses. Over the next eighteen months, hundreds of prisoners, mostly French, arrived in Flossenbürg after having been seized by German occupation authorities under the Night and Fog (Nacht und Nebel) Decree. Before 1944, relatively few Jews were prisoners in Flossenbürg, probably no more than 100. In mid-October 1942, the SS deported the surviving 12 Jews to Auschwitz in accordance with general SS orders concerning Jews in German concentration camps. To this point, according to the official camp death registry, 78 Jews had died in the camp. Between August 4, 1944 and the middle of January 1945, at least 10,000 Jews, mostly Hungarian and Polish Jews, arrived in Flossenbürg and its subcamps. Some 13,000 more came in the winter months of 1945, as the SS evacuated other camps to the East and West. In January 1945, there were almost 40,000 prisoners in the Flossenbürg camp system, including almost 11,000 women. At its high point in March 1945, nearly 53,000 prisoners were in Flossenbürg camp system, with about 14,500 in the main camp. Living conditions in Flossenbürg were extremely hard. The SS administration itself considered Flossenbürg as a "Hard Regime" concentration camp. Most of the prisoners had to work in the stone quarries. The malnutrition, the total lack of hygiene and medical care, and the brutality of the SS guards were the main causes of the death of thousands of prisoners in Flossenbürg as well as in its sub-camps. Initially, the SS staff deployed the prisoners in the construction of the concentration camp itself and in the nearby granite quarry. Until mid-1943, the quarry occupied the labor of about half of the prisoner population. Another employer was an SS-owned weaving workshop. In accordance with SS efforts to provide forced labor for the German armaments industry, the Messerschmidt company established a plant in February 1943, in which prisoners produced parts for ME-109 fighter planes. After Allied bombers seriously damaged the central Messerschmidt plant in Regensburg in August 1943, the company's managers moved surviving production facilities to various locations, among them concentration camps, including Flossenbürg and its subcamps. The production of aircraft parts thus dominated labor deployment in the Flossenbürg system by 1944. The conditions under which the camp authorities forced the prisoners to work and the absence of even rudimentary medical care facilitated the spread of disease, including dysentery and typhus. In addition to the dreadful living conditions, the prisoners suffered beatings and arbitrary punishments. SS overseers and prisoner functionaries (the camp and block elders, and the kapos) abused and killed prisoners according to whim in addition to the typical “official” punishments of prisoners (solitary confinement, standing at attention for hours, whipping, hanging from posts, and transfer to penal labor details). A condition unique to Flossenbürg was the presence and “veteran status” of the numerous criminal offenders in the prisoner population. Tolerated by the SS, they tended to dominate the prisoner administration, which, as a result, was particularly brutal and corrupt. This hierarchy of criminal prisoners distinguished itself in sexual exploitation of lower ranking prisoners: coerced homosexual relationships and outright rape occurred frequently enough to induce the camp authorities to segregate male minors in a separate barracks, in a futile attempt to interdict efforts to sexually prey upon them. An estimated 73,000 inmates died until the camp was liberated by the 2nd U.S. Cavalry on 23 April 1945.

THE VERY RARE ORIGINAL GROUPING OF A GUARD IN THE

2. / SS-TOTENKOPF STURMBANN FLOSSENBURG CONCENTRATION CAMP

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